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Unilever Solutions elevates the restaurant industry through training in food safety. Every culinary student worth his chef ’s jacket will relentlessly have the voice of his instructor playing in his head, reminding him about the value of handling food properly. In the same vein, it’s every restaurant owner’s nightmare to have a customer complain of food poisoning. But face it, in the commercial kitchen sphere, not everyone is created equal. There are the schooled ones adroit with the nuances of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), a systematic approach to food safety, and there are those who never got any formal training and are in it because of their passion for cooking.

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Training deserving individuals for the hotel and restaurant industry has inspired an enterprising school in Benguet to grow from strength to strength

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THE LANDMARK RESTAURANT IS FINALLY HONORED WITH A HISTORICAL MARKER. Who can’t resist that plate of juicy chicken barbecue served with yellow Java
rice, thick and sweet Java sauce and atchara? This classic meal has become a familiar taste to the Filipino palate. But before this dish became an icon, a rich tradition surrounds its maker – the now 77-year-old The Aristocrat Restaurant. Tracing its history, the Aristocrat Restaurant’s founders, Engracia Cruz-Reyes and her husband Alex Reyes,

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Using silk as a platform creates a lighter, almost ephemeral feel, no matter how big the artwork. Swiss-based Filipino artist Marissa Gonzalez has just come off from her second Manila exhibit, Under the Mediterranean Skies, staged at ArtistSpace of the Ayala Museum, which ran from January 29 to February 12, 2015. Her first, The Road to Silence was also held there in 2013. Gonzalez, granddaughter of President Elipidio Quirino, distinguishes herself by using the raw silk material used for the barong Tagalog – jusi – as the unique canvas for her exquisite paintings.

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Child and Family Service Philippines (CFSPI) is a non-stock, not-for-profit, non-sectarian Filipino non-government organization based in Baguio. It was co-founded in 1987 by Patti J. Lyons, then-president and chief executive officer...

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CHEF PHILIP GOLDING PULLS ALL THE STOPS TO CREATE WONDERS FOR THE DELI BUSINESS. S & L Fine Foods is a purveyor of large wedges of cheese from Europe, capers, sun-dried products, olive oil, and pastas from the Mediterranean, cookies and short breads from England and quality meat from Australia and Italy. S&L has products mostly from Germany, Italy, France, Turkey, Spain, Australia and the UK. You’ll find S&L at 135-B Yakal Street in San Antonio Village in Makati, somewhere behind the Makati fire department and squeezed in between Sinan’s Butchery and the Brera Delicatessen. The Brera is its retail arm where you find imported cheese,

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It is a dinner that has the makings of a fine dining in a classy restaurant. Everything is perfect: a foreign-sounding menu I had difficulty pronouncing; food that looks good (and tastes even better) with high- quality ingredients served in small, artfully presented portions; and near impeccable service in clockwork precision. Except that I was not dressed for the part and that it was a dinner workshop for students at the training restaurant of the International Culinary Arts Academy Cebu (ICAAC).

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Dedicated solely to the Filipino child, this 21-year-old institution shows that learning and fun go hand in hand. The Museo Pambata holds a special place in my  heart. My first job was as a teacher in a pre-school called Early Learning Center and it was its owner and director, Nina Lim-Yuson, who hired me fresh out of  college armed with a degree in Economics and not Education. After a trip to the US with her four children that included a visit to the Boston Children’s Museum,  Nina declared that she wanted to set up the same kind of museum in the Philippines.

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Travel provides an education like no other.

The Museo Pambata recently partnered with European Union (EU) member countries to prove just that in the“Lakbayin Natin ang EU” program.

For the seventh year running, children from various Metro Manila barangays “visited the EU” through storytelling, art workshops, games and other fun activities.

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HOW THE U.K. CULINARY SCENE IS EVOLVING FROM CENTURIES-OLD TRADITION. British cuisine, if Chef Derek Quelch is to be believed, is undergoing a sea change. A recent visitor to the Philippines under the auspices of the British Embassy to usher in a food festival, this culinary ambassador is out to quash tired notions of tradtional British fare. Food lovers usually conjure up images of fish and chips, roast beef, sticky toffee pudding, steamed chocolate sponge, meringue with whipped cream and sausages. Quelch says that in the past 20 years, British cuisine has been undergoing a transformation. Even traditional British pubs known for their beverages

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Get acquainted with the Summer Capital of the Philippines in a whole new way through the Baguio GeoTour

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A mining NGO and Land Rover enthusiasts come together to aid the marginalized. Synergy has been defined as the cooperation and interaction between two or more groups or organizations.

Bring together an NGO (non-government organization) like Diwata-Women in Resource Development – the fledgling club of geologists, mining engineers, communication officers, finance experts and other professionally trained women keen on the responsible development of national resources and protection of the land and its indigenous communities – and the Land Rover Club of the Philippines (LRCP), and that is exactly what ensues.

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If you stop to consider it, there’s something inherently gleeful about playing in the mud. However, the expectation is that past a certain age, we’re expected to tire of it and become adults. It’s almost unanimously agreed upon in society that busy grown-ups have neither the time nor the inclination for frolicking in mud. And yet happily challenging the assertion that adults shouldn’t play in mud are the members of the Land Rover Club of the Philippines. a group of men and women–many of them easily described as successes in their various fields drawn together by a shared love of Land Rovers, and mud. Or more succinctly, off-roading which involves experiencing the country’s off beaten path.

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Southville Foreign University, through its international partners, prepares its students for the international market. Filipino workers are known for their excellent English skills, diligence and a caring attitude. Because of that, they’re in high demand abroad. Go to almost any country and you’ll usually find a strong Filipino community of migrants or overseas contractual workers. But for those with global aspirations, the process to get on such a career track – especially in the hospitality and tourism industry – is fraught with challenges such as dealing with various agencies, employers, visas, tests, certification requirements – and that’s only the star

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When Emmanuel “Noey” Tantoco Lopez went into the requisite five-month training as a  new partner of the global franchise Starbucks Coffee Company in 1997,  he didn’t realize he was going to fall in love with a culture.  Now as the  Chief Operating Officer of Rustan Coffee, which manages Starbucks Philippines, he enthuses, “It’s not just about the traditional way of doing business to just make a profit.  The founding fathers had a vision.  The more I learned what Starbucks stood for, the more I loved it.”

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Swatch Philippines
teams up with
BenCab for
25th Anniversary

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Believing in the Local Brew

A one-stop shop for Philippine coffee entrepreneurs supplies 100 percent domestically grown roasted beans and ground coffee to fine establishments around the country

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Bringing Home-Baked Goodness to Modern Consumers 
A commercial kitchen proves it’s possible to produce 
food items just as if your mother made them

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Lyceum of the Philippines’ new Culinary Institute seeks to invest top-notch skills, work ethics and discipline in young professionals eager to carve out a career in the F&B world

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One day, while on an ATV (allterrain vehicle) ride to the uplands of Baclayon, Bohol, Joel Uichico noticed a common phenomenon. By then he had been working for five years on community-based ecotourism programs, which took him to remote areas of the town. He saw children in slippers hauling their backpacks as  they walked to and from school in rough terrain under the elements. Uichico decided to interview one of the principals, who confirmed that the children did attend school on foot, walking as many as seven kilometers for hours in rain and sun.